Click Here
To Launch Audio Player



THE DRIP
'Siren'
» click here to listen «


BRAINSTORM
'Erased By The Dark'
» click here to listen «


21OCTAYNE
'The Heart (Save Me)'
» click here to listen «


GAMMA RAY
'Hellbent'
» click here to listen «

Select By Letter...
1 - 10 of 2699 Found!
Next >>
INHUMAN REMNANTS
Inattentional Blindness
JILL HUGHES KIRTLAND
Not Just Tits In A Corset: Celebrating Women In Metal
REVONTULET
Hear Me
TRIPTYKON
Melana Chasmata
GAMMA RAY
Empire Of The Undead
PACT
The Infernal Hierarchies, Penetrating The Threshold Of Night
I AM HERESY
Thy Will
THE OATH
The Oath
ESKHATON
Worship Death
WARTHRONE
Venomassacre



HARDWARES

RIVERS OF NIHIL

The Conscious Seed Of Light

(Metal Blade)

Reviewed by : Greg Pratt
Rating : 6.5

This is the debut full-length for this Pennsylvania-based technical death metal band, and they've managed to secure a big, comfy home on Metal Blade for it. Good for 'em, and the chops on display here proves they've earned it, drummer Ron Nelson in particular going for it, his atypical beats and fills in 'Rain Eater' a pretty cool way to get things started. The band flirt with some deathcore sounds and the vocals are more hardcore-guy bellowed than Cookie Monster gurgled, so the longhair's shorthair radar might go off a bit here, but I'm here to say don't sweat it: these guys have enough pure death metal running through them to make up for any 'core leanings that you are averse to. However, the songs do all race past as a huge blur of parts and breakdowns, of grinding and hollering, stopping and starting: the band suffers from what most young technical death metal bands suffer from: a lack of cohesion, a lack of songs. Even parts like the mellow guitar break in 'Birth Of The Omnisavior' help both break up the beatdown and also provide the listener with something to remember. Hopefully next time out they work on crafting something memorable for the ages as opposed to a breakdown pit stop soundtrack, even if it is a totally adept one. Here, songs like closer 'Airless' stand out because of their uniqueness: sludgey, double-bass driven, with a soaring guitar solo, it's all intense and moving, but then the inappropriate blast beats kick in... why? 'Mechanical Trees' is also a highlight for the emotion it threatens to convey, but the piecemeal approach quickly strips the humanity away. This is a grower, though (even on just the second listen, the enjoyment factor skyrockets), and, most importantly, it shows great promise for next time around.



facebook
twitter



Google
 
Web www.bravewords.com