Click Here
To Launch Audio Player



THE DRIP
'Siren'
» click here to listen «


BRAINSTORM
'Erased By The Dark'
» click here to listen «


21OCTAYNE
'The Heart (Save Me)'
» click here to listen «


GAMMA RAY
'Hellbent'
» click here to listen «

Select By Letter...
1 - 10 of 2699 Found!
Next >>
INHUMAN REMNANTS
Inattentional Blindness
JILL HUGHES KIRTLAND
Not Just Tits In A Corset: Celebrating Women In Metal
REVONTULET
Hear Me
TRIPTYKON
Melana Chasmata
GAMMA RAY
Empire Of The Undead
PACT
The Infernal Hierarchies, Penetrating The Threshold Of Night
I AM HERESY
Thy Will
THE OATH
The Oath
ESKHATON
Worship Death
WARTHRONE
Venomassacre



HARDWARES

MICK O'SHEA

Cemetery Gates: Saints and Survivors of the Heavy Metal Scene

(Plexus Publishing)

Reviewed by : Greg Pratt
Rating : 7.5

It's easy to think this is going to be sensationalistic stuff, a book taking a look at the most controversial characters in metal almost predetermined to be a bit tasteless by nature of the dudes discussed within. But damned if author Mick O'Shea doesn't do a good job at outlining each person's life within the small amount of pages each one gets. The book is separated into two sections: "saints" (dead and gone) and "survivors" (alive and "well"). Some saints include Ronnie James Dio, Paul Gray, Pete Steele and Dimebag Darrell; survivors are folk like Lemmy, Axl Rose, and Ozzy. Sure, the names and the stories are familiar, but some revelations are to be found: John Bonham's legendarily destructive behaviour being pretty obviously tied to him having to be away from his family for such long stretches, for example. Some of this stuff is really heartbreaking, when it comes down to it; we all get a chuckle out of the reckless life these guys lead/led, but reading this book is a harsh reminder that the root of the hotel room destruction, rampant groupie, um, usage, and over-the-top addictions lies in something that we maybe shouldn't be laughing at after all. Some new interviews would have made all the difference; this book is compiled of quotes from other sources, giving it a bit of a supermarket-lineup feel to it. But, the writing is passionate, filled with info, and even provides some much-needed humour throughout. A bit of a chilling, harrowing read, one that, like I say, treads ground that is a bit too familiar at times (it's hard to get excited about reading the history of some of these dudes yet again), but is well worth a read nonetheless, because it just may make you think about rock and roll excesses in a new light.



facebook
twitter



Google
 
Web www.bravewords.com